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  • The O-Shot (an injection in your G-spot)

     

    Female sexuality and the need to understand it before medicalising it.

    Only days ago I read an article about the “O-Shot”, a new vaginal injection that claims to considerably improve the quality of women’s sexual response, by using the woman’s own ‘growth factors’ derived from her blood.  I have my reservations about the “O-Shot” which stands for Orgasm Shot. Firstly, where does the injection go? The press release states that O-Shot is delivered to an area critical in determining whether or not a woman is able to achieve a vaginal orgasm (um, please, somebody tell where this area is immediately so I can explore it this afternoon - minus the injection). It is also critical to point out that the doctors who created the O-Shot have trademarked the term, which also loosely means, that they’ve invented the zone. Suspicious.

    My issue is not with the O-Shot, but more with the lack of understanding surrounding women’s sexuality. Historically, women have been left in the dark, shaped and steered for a long time by Freud’s male-centric views of female sexuality.

    Only in recent years has there been substantial research into the mysteries surrounding the anatomy and the biology of the woman. Thanks to pioneers like, Betty Dodson, Odile Buisson who did some amazing work around the female sexual response cycle and more recently urologist and home-town hero Helen O’Connell who produced some ground-breaking work around the anatomy of the internal clitoris.

    Yet as the cogs of this research machine are hard at work, rarely do such breakthroughs in sexuality understanding garner the support in media and big business to help educate our society as a whole. By contrast the bandaid effect is rampant in our highly medicalised society – we are so quick to highlight individual differences as abnormality and dysfunction, providing a pill, a shot or surgery to cure a perceived deformity, disease or illness. When the truth regarding sexuality and our sexual beings, is that we are individuals; both unique and in need of time. Time for communication and a better understanding of ourselves. Now and again expertise is helpful in working out what makes us tick and it is important to acknowledge that sometimes medication, therapy and classification of ‘illness’ are necessary and worth investing in, because our sexual selves and the exploration of such, impact who we are.

    The answers surrounding the mystery of the internal orgasm are in my mind never answered by a shot of growth serum into your own vagina. Sexuality is not a question or a problem that needs answering, it is a side of our selves that is about exploration, intimacy, communication, survival and fulfilment.

    Maybe one day a shot into the vagina that improves the so-called appropriate sexual response of a woman will be worth its while. Yet until someone can convince me that a ‘normal’ sexual response exists and, of the value in pigeonholing it - I’m not looking to the O-shot for answers. 

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